JSF Framework Books

Java Server Faces In Action by Kito D. Mann

JavaServer Faces in Action is an introduction, a tutorial, and a handy reference. With the help of many examples, the book explains what JSF is, how it works, and how it relates to other frameworks and technologies like Struts, Servlets, Portlets, JSP, and JSTL. It provides detailed coverage of standard components, renderers, converters, and validators, and how to use them to create solid applications. This book will help you start building JSF solutions today.

About the Author
An independent enterprise architect and developer, Kito D. Mann runs the JSFCentral.com community site and is a member of the JSF 1.2 and JSP 2.1 Expert Groups. He lives in Stamford, Connec-ticut with his wife, two parrots, and four cats.

Core JavaServer Faces by David M. Geary

JavaServer Faces (JSF) is the standard Java EE technology for building web user interfaces. It provides a powerful framework for developing server-side applications, allowing you to cleanly separate visual presentation and application logic. JSF 2.0 is a major upgrade, which not only adds many useful features but also greatly simplifies the programming model by using annotations and convention over configuration for common tasks.
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Core JavaServer FacesJavaServer Faces 2.0: The Complete Reference by Ed Burns

JavaServer Faces 2.0: The Complete Reference features an integrated sample application to use as a model for your own JSF applications, with code available online. The book explains all JSF features, including the request processing lifecycle, managed beans, page navigation, component development, Ajax, validation, internationalization, and security. Expert Group Insights throughout the book offer insider information on the design of JSF.

JavaServer Faces, 614 Pages by Hans Bergsten

In JavaServer Faces, developers learn how to use this new framework to build real-world web applications. The book contains everything you’ll need: how to construct the HTML on the front end; how to create the user interface components that connect the front end to your business objects; how to write a back-end that’s JSF-friendly; and how to create the deployment descriptors that tie everything together.

JavaServer Faces pays particular attention to simple tasks that are easily ignored, but crucial to any real application: working with tablular data, for example, or enabling and disabling buttons. And this book doesn’t hide from the trickier issues, like creating custom components or creating renderers for different presentation layers. Whether you’re experienced with JSF or a just starting out, you’ll find everything you need to know about this technology in this book.Topics covered include: The JSF environment

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